Downsize in 3D, Supersize in 1D: Effects of the Dimensionality of Package and Portion Size Changes on Size Estimations, Consumption, and Quantity Discount Expectations

In five studies, we demonstrate that size estimations are more elastic when packages and portions change along one dimension (e.g., only in height) than when they change along two or more dimensions (e.g., in height and diameter). This biasing effect of dimensionality on size perception leads consumers to expect steeper quantity discounts for packages and portions increased in multiple dimensions than in one dimension, even if objective size information is provided. These biases also make people prefer and produce more accurate doses in packages and portions supersized along one (vs. multiple) dimension and those downsized along multiple (vs. one) dimensions.



Citation:

Pierre Chandon and Nailya Ordabayeva (2009) ,"Downsize in 3D, Supersize in 1D: Effects of the Dimensionality of Package and Portion Size Changes on Size Estimations, Consumption, and Quantity Discount Expectations", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 36, eds. Ann L. McGill and Sharon Shavitt, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 195-197.

Authors

Pierre Chandon, INSEAD, France
Nailya Ordabayeva, INSEAD, France



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 36 | 2009



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