The Impact of Matching Between Emotion Types and Product Offerings on Evaluations

Drawing on the feeling-as-information mechanism, this research examines the differential informational role of two positive discrete emotions, beyond valence, for consumer judgments. Proposing emotion congruency bias effects, this research suggests that a match between felt emotion and the emotional appeal of a product would generate more favorable evaluations toward the product relative to a mismatch. The results of two studies suggest that travel products with adventurous (versus serene) offerings are more favorably evaluated under excitement than under serenity. Furthermore, this research shows that such an enhanced evaluation under a match vs. mismatch happens via heightened estimates of the occurrence of product offerings.



Citation:

Kiwan Park, Hakkyun Kim, and Norbert Schwarz (2009) ,"The Impact of Matching Between Emotion Types and Product Offerings on Evaluations", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 36, eds. Ann L. McGill and Sharon Shavitt, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 672-673.

Authors

Kiwan Park, Seoul National University, Republic of Korea
Hakkyun Kim, Concordia University, Canada
Norbert Schwarz, University of Michigan, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 36 | 2009



Share Proceeding

Featured papers

See More

Featured

Product Complexity as a Barrier to Consumer Financial Decision-Making

Timothy Dunn, University of Colorado, USA
Philip M. Fernbach, University of Colorado, USA
Ji Hoon Jhang, Oklahoma State University, USA
John Lynch, University of Colorado, USA

Read More

Featured

When Consumers Choose for Others, Their Preferences Diverge from Their Own Salient Goals

Olya Bullard, University of Winnipeg

Read More

Featured

Potions and Antidotes for Jekyll: What Summons Moral Identity in Product Choices

Young Joo Cho, Korea University, Korea
Y. Rin Yoon, Korea University, Korea
Jongwon Park, Korea University, Korea

Read More

Engage with Us

Becoming an Association for Consumer Research member is simple. Membership in ACR is relatively inexpensive, but brings significant benefits to its members.