Toward a More Comprehensive Theory of Attitude Change: the Effects of Inter-Attitudinal Concept Structure on Attitude Dynamics

Theories of attitude change have generally failed to identify an architecture of inter-attitudinal structure. Such a failure is critical to consumer researchers for whom understanding attitudes is a primary pursuit. This theoretical study examined two competing models that explicitly address the influence of inter-attitudinal structure on attitude change dynamics. An experiment was conducted that manipulated nature of structure, priming, and focal concept of a persuasive message. The results show that linguistic organizational structures influence attitude change. However, such change is constrained less by a concept’s relative position in the structure and more by the strength of the concept’s association with other concepts in that structure.



Citation:

Leslie Dinauer (2009) ,"Toward a More Comprehensive Theory of Attitude Change: the Effects of Inter-Attitudinal Concept Structure on Attitude Dynamics", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 36, eds. Ann L. McGill and Sharon Shavitt, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 621-622.

Authors

Leslie Dinauer, University of Maryland University College, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 36 | 2009



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