Visual Inferences and Advertising Spending in Political Marketing

This paper explores how advertising spending and candidate appearance influence Congressional electoral outcomes. Our analyses reveal that campaign spending and visual inferences about candidate personality traits significantly predict vote share, but these factors have asymmetric effects across the major parties.



Citation:

Michael Lewis and JoAndrea Hoegg (2009) ,"Visual Inferences and Advertising Spending in Political Marketing", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 36, eds. Ann L. McGill and Sharon Shavitt, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 728-729.

Authors

Michael Lewis, Washington University in St. Louis, USA
JoAndrea Hoegg, University of British Columbia, Canada



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 36 | 2009



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