Consumer Emotional Intelligence: a Comparison Between the U.S. and China

Consumption decisions often satisfy consumers’ various psychological needs and serve a social purpose by reflecting ties to one’s family, community, and cultural groups. These distinct orientations may provide important insights into how consumers process emotional information and how they use that information to make brand decisions. In this research, we explore the antecedent role of consumer emotional intelligence on decision making differences between collectivist and individualistic orientations; specifically Chinese and American consumers. Further, we compare the consumer emotional intelligence scale across these two distinct cultures to better understand its validity and dimensionality.



Citation:

Robert Jewell, Annie Peng Cui, Blair Kidwell, and Desheng Wang (2009) ,"Consumer Emotional Intelligence: a Comparison Between the U.S. and China", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 36, eds. Ann L. McGill and Sharon Shavitt, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 93-96.

Authors

Robert Jewell, Kent State University, USA
Annie Peng Cui, West Virginia University, USA
Blair Kidwell, University of Kentucky, USA
Desheng Wang, Shandong University, China



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 36 | 2009



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