The Impact of Social Categorization on Persuasion Effectiveness

In the current research, the precise impact of persuasion attempts from out-group members is examined. Based on different streams of research, both a relatively smaller persuasive effect of out-group members and a differentiation away from the out-group can be hypothesized. In a series of four experiments, we find convincing evidence for the differentiation expectation; persuasion attempts from out-group members led to opinions opposite from the out-group opinion, irrespective of the nature of the group categorization. Furthermore, we show that persuasion attempts from in-group members only influence attitudes when an intergroup context is made salient.



Citation:

Mirjam Tuk, Peeter Verlegh, Ale Smidts, and Daniel Wigboldus (2009) ,"The Impact of Social Categorization on Persuasion Effectiveness", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 36, eds. Ann L. McGill and Sharon Shavitt, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 596-597.

Authors

Mirjam Tuk, University of Groningen, The Netherlands
Peeter Verlegh, Erasmus University, The Netherlands
Ale Smidts, Erasmus University, The Netherlands
Daniel Wigboldus, Radboud University Nijmegen, The Netherlands



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 36 | 2009



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