Sequencing Promotion and Prevention Features: the Moderating Role of Regulatory Focus

We show that mixing the promotion and prevention features of a brand (i.e., presenting them alternatively) instead of blocking them (i.e., presenting all promotion features first or last) increases the brand’s perceived variety among both promotion and prevention-focused consumers, but the difference in liking between the mixed and blocked feature sequences is higher among promotion-focused consumers relative to prevention-focused consumers. We suggest that the enhanced variety perception gives the impression that the brand is a change from the status-quo, and the desire for change fits better with the advancement goals of promotion-focused consumers.



Citation:

Subimal Chatterjee, Ashwin Malshe, and Timothy Heath (2009) ,"Sequencing Promotion and Prevention Features: the Moderating Role of Regulatory Focus", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 36, eds. Ann L. McGill and Sharon Shavitt, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 791-792.

Authors

Subimal Chatterjee, Binghamton University, USA
Ashwin Malshe, Binghamton University, USA
Timothy Heath, Miami University, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 36 | 2009



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