Using Brands to Communicate Self: How Effective Are We?

A characteristic of contemporary societies is the centrality of the self and the wide acceptance that individuals use brands and/or products to create, maintain and communicate aspects of their ‘self’. This use has been extensively studied by consumer researchers. The studies are primarily unidirectional, in that they report how the individual thinks the brand works to support aspects of their ‘self’. The question of whether the communication is actually effective has had minimal attention. This study uses data gathered via auto photography observation, and semi-structured interviews to answer this questions.



Citation:

Renu Emile, Margaret Craig-Lees, and Ken Hyde (2009) ,"Using Brands to Communicate Self: How Effective Are We?", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 36, eds. Ann L. McGill and Sharon Shavitt, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 851-852.

Authors

Renu Emile, Auckland University of Technology, New Zealand
Margaret Craig-Lees, Auckland University of Technology, New Zealand
Ken Hyde, Auckland University of Technology, New Zealand



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 36 | 2009



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