When Choosing Is No Longer a Burden: the Mitigating Effect of Positive Affect and Novelty on Choice Overload

Results from four studies show that either positive affect or novelty mitigates the negative consequences of choice overload. People in whom positive affect had been induced, or who had experienced novelty, enjoyed choosing from a large, but not from a small, assortment of jams more than controls and were more satisfied with the selected option. Studies three and four extended these findings to measures of post-sampling satisfaction. It is proposed that positive affect and novelty mitigate the negative consequences of assortment size by enhancing people’s cognitive flexibility and ability to organize material and by promoting a preference for variety.



Citation:

Alice M. Isen and Gergana Spassova (2009) ,"When Choosing Is No Longer a Burden: the Mitigating Effect of Positive Affect and Novelty on Choice Overload", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 36, eds. Ann L. McGill and Sharon Shavitt, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 157-160.

Authors

Alice M. Isen, Cornell University, USA
Gergana Spassova, Cornell University, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 36 | 2009



Share Proceeding

Featured papers

See More

Featured

From a Culinary Phantasm to an Eudaimonic Well-Being : Exploring The Experience of Amateur Cooking Classes

Virginie Brégeon de Saint-Quentin, Ferrandi Paris, the french school of gastronomy
Ophélie Mugel, Chaire SDSC AgroParisTech, Université Paris Est

Read More

Featured

Rejecting Moralized Products: Moral Identity as a Predictor of Reactance to “Vegetarian” and “Sustainable” Labels

Rishad Habib, University of British Columbia, Canada
Yann Cornil, University of British Columbia, Canada
Karl Aquino, University of British Columbia, Canada

Read More

Featured

Consumer Perceptions of Environmental ‘Win-Wins’

Tamar Makov, Yale University, USA
George Newman, Yale University, USA

Read More

Engage with Us

Becoming an Association for Consumer Research member is simple. Membership in ACR is relatively inexpensive, but brings significant benefits to its members.