‘Nigella’, an Iconic Brand in the Baking: Culinary Culture, Gastrobrands and Identity Myths

This paper investigates ways in which celebrity functions as a mode of economic production whereby cultural resources are celebritized in pursuit of marketplace appeals. We explore those issues through developing case material that consists of representations of a celebrity chef which are available for consumption through a collection of superior photographic print images situated within a contemporary ‘lifestyle’ cookery book to explore how an evolving iconic brand can be understood not merely as a way of structuring competition, but as a ‘media object’ which is the product of the logic of celebrity culture and the celebrity gastro brand of ‘Nigella’.



Citation:

Paul Hewer and Douglas Brownlie (2009) ,"‘Nigella’, an Iconic Brand in the Baking: Culinary Culture, Gastrobrands and Identity Myths", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 36, eds. Ann L. McGill and Sharon Shavitt, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 482-487.

Authors

Paul Hewer, University of Strathclyde, UK
Douglas Brownlie, University of Stirling, UK



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 36 | 2009



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