Change, Change, Change: Evolving Health Guidelines, Preventive Health Behaviors, and Interventions to Mitigate Harm

Media reports of health research are an everyday occurrence. While informative, when recommendations change, consumers are confused about what health behaviors are best for them. This confusion leads to doubt, and many consumers fail to perform the recommended behavior, but also unrelated health behaviors. Our research considers what types of guideline changes cause these negative reactions (Study 1), what types of psychological processes and traits contribute to these reactions (Study 2), and what types of interventions attenuate these reactions (Study 3). The presentation will focus on the success of these interventions, which are designed to accompany media reports of health research.



Citation:

Christine Moorman, Mary Frances Luce, and James R. Bettman (2009) ,"Change, Change, Change: Evolving Health Guidelines, Preventive Health Behaviors, and Interventions to Mitigate Harm", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 36, eds. Ann L. McGill and Sharon Shavitt, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 165-167.

Authors

Christine Moorman, Duke University, USA
Mary Frances Luce, Duke University, USA
James R. Bettman, Duke University, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 36 | 2009



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