A Measure of Brand Values: Cross-Cultural Implications For Brand Preferences

This research extends existing work in brand personality and shows that consumers associate familiar brands with personal values. In four studies using multi-cultural samples of consumers from different countries, the authors developed a reliable and valid measure of the values associated with familiar consumer brands (brand values scale), and used this measure to predict cross-cultural patterns of brand preferences. Results suggest that the cultural dimensions of vertical-horizontal, individualism-collectivism predict consumers’ preferences for brands associated with culturally-congruent values. Brand values emerge as an important construct to better understand the relationships that multicultural consumers establish with their brands.



Citation:

Carlos Torelli, Aysegul Ozsomer, and Sergio Carvalho (2009) ,"A Measure of Brand Values: Cross-Cultural Implications For Brand Preferences", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 36, eds. Ann L. McGill and Sharon Shavitt, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 41-44.

Authors

Carlos Torelli, University of Minnesota, USA
Aysegul Ozsomer, Koc University, Turkey
Sergio Carvalho, University of Manitoba, Canada



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 36 | 2009



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