Too Much to Take In?: the Role of Advertising Variables, Emotions and Visual Attention in Consumer Learning For Really New Products

Really New Products (RNPs) create new product categories or at least significantly expand existing ones. The difficulty for consumers to learn about RNPs is a significant barrier to the success of these products, yet marketing communications can contribute to the enhancement of individual-level cognition for RNPs. This study is an investigation of a) advertising variables that may be manipulated to enhance comprehension of RNPs (learning strategy and presentation format), b) the extent to which an emotional response (discouragement) acts as a mediator between the advertising variables and comprehension and c) the explanatory role of visual attention in learning for RNPs.



Citation:

Stephanie Feiereisen, Veronica Wong, and Amanda J. Broderick (2009) ,"Too Much to Take In?: the Role of Advertising Variables, Emotions and Visual Attention in Consumer Learning For Really New Products", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 36, eds. Ann L. McGill and Sharon Shavitt, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 765-766.

Authors

Stephanie Feiereisen, University of Aston, UK
Veronica Wong, University of Aston, UK
Amanda J. Broderick, Coventry University, UK



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 36 | 2009



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