Competitive Brand Salience

This study assesses brand salience using a model of eye-movement recordings, collected during a brand search experiment. We estimate brands’ salience at the point-of-purchase, based on perceptual features (color, luminance, edges) and how these are influenced by consumers’ search goals. We show that the salience of brands has a pervasive effect on search performance. We identify two key sources of brand salience. The bottom-up component is influenced by in-store activity and package design. The top-down component is influenced by out-of-store marketing activities such as advertising. Our study reveals that about one-third of salience on the shelf is due to out-of-store and two-thirds due to in-store marketing.



Citation:

Ralf van der Lans, Rik Pieters, and Michel Wedel (2009) ,"Competitive Brand Salience", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 36, eds. Ann L. McGill and Sharon Shavitt, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 100-103.

Authors

Ralf van der Lans, Erasmus University, The Netherlands
Rik Pieters, Tilburg University, The Netherlands
Michel Wedel, University of Maryland, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 36 | 2009



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