Does In-Store Marketing Work? Effects of the Number and Position of Shelf Facings on Attention, Consideration, and Choice At the Point of Purchase.

To help answer the question of whether marketers are right to increase their in-store marketing expenditures, we examine the interplay between in-store and out-of-store factors on consumer attention, consideration, and choice among brands displayed on supermarket shelves. We find that increasing the number of facings helps attention and choice, especially for regular users and low market-share brands. We also find that the vertical and horizontal position on the shelves influence attention, but that not all this enhanced attention helps consideration and choice. These findings provide insights into important issues for eye-tracking research and underscore the importance of combining eye-tracking and purchase data.



Citation:

Pierre Chandon, Wesley Hutchinson, and Eric Bradlow (2009) ,"Does In-Store Marketing Work? Effects of the Number and Position of Shelf Facings on Attention, Consideration, and Choice At the Point of Purchase.", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 36, eds. Ann L. McGill and Sharon Shavitt, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 100-103.

Authors

Pierre Chandon, INSEAD, France
Wesley Hutchinson, University of Pennsylvania, USA
Eric Bradlow, University of Pennsylvania, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 36 | 2009



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