A Typology of Superstitious Behaviors: Implications For Marketing and Public Policy

In this conceptual article we present a comprehensive model of superstitious behavior and explain its relevance to marketing, consumer behavior, and public policy. Drawing on theory from marketing, psychology, anthropology, and sociology, we propose that individuals engage in superstitious to meet functional needs, psychological needs, and socio-cultural needs. Based on this theoretical foundation, we explain how marketing tactics can stimulate aspects of superstitious behavior among individuals which gives rise to significant public policy implications.



Citation:

Rajiv Vaidyanathan and Praveen Aggarwal (2008) ,"A Typology of Superstitious Behaviors: Implications For Marketing and Public Policy", in LA - Latin American Advances in Consumer Research Volume 2, eds. Claudia R. Acevedo, Jose Mauro C. Hernandez, and Tina M. Lowrey, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 147-149.

Authors

Rajiv Vaidyanathan, University of Minnesota Duluth, USA
Praveen Aggarwal, University of Minnesota Duluth, USA



Volume

LA - Latin American Advances in Consumer Research Volume 2 | 2008



Share Proceeding

Featured papers

See More

Featured

Do Altruistic Individuals "Share" More Contents on Social Media?

Travis Tae Oh, Columbia University, USA
Keith Wilcox, Columbia University, USA

Read More

Featured

J14. You Reflect Me: Narcissistic Consumers Prefer Anthropomorphized Arrogant Brands

Norah Awad, Hongik University
Nara Youn, Hongik University

Read More

Featured

F4. Social Support First, Money Later: Perceived Economic Mobility Increases Happiness When Perceived Social Support Opens the Door

Yong Ju Kwon, Seoul National University, USA
Sara Kim, University of Hong Kong
Youjae Yi, Seoul National University

Read More

Engage with Us

Becoming an Association for Consumer Research member is simple. Membership in ACR is relatively inexpensive, but brings significant benefits to its members.