When Does Personalization Fail? An Analysis of Recommendation Agents

Research on personalization suggests that online recommendation agents improve consumer decision making by enhancing the quality of the process and the ultimate decision (Haubl and Trifts 2001; Chellappa and Sin 2005). Drawing on the personalization literature in Information Systems and Ratchford’s (1987) product categorization framework, we aim to show the boundary conditions of this claim and argue that the level of personalization and the type of recommended product (hedonic vs. utilitarian) can make a difference in the perceived security and personalization of the website. A pilot study has shown consistent results with our hypotheses.



Citation:

Kivilcim Dogerlioglu-Demir, Asli Basoglu, and Jeffrey Radighieri (2008) ,"When Does Personalization Fail? An Analysis of Recommendation Agents", in LA - Latin American Advances in Consumer Research Volume 2, eds. Claudia R. Acevedo, Jose Mauro C. Hernandez, and Tina M. Lowrey, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 195-195.

Authors

Kivilcim Dogerlioglu-Demir, Washington State University, USA
Asli Basoglu, Washington State University, USA
Jeffrey Radighieri, Washington State University, USA



Volume

LA - Latin American Advances in Consumer Research Volume 2 | 2008



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