Effects of Articulatory Suppression on Phonetic Symbolism Effects on Brand Name Preference

Recent research suggests that phonetic symbolism—the notion that the sound of a word can convey meaning apart from the word’s actual definition—can influence brand name preference (Lowrey and Shrum 2007). In this study, we show that front and back vowel sounds influence brand name preference, but only when phonetic information is allowed to enter the phonological (memory) store. When phonetic information is allowed to enter the phonological store (by simply having participants read the brand names to themselves), front vowel sounds (which connote attributes such as fast and small) are preferred over back vowel sounds (which connote attributes such as big, powerful) when the product category is a two-seater convertible but the pattern of results is reversed when the product category is an SUV. However, when phonetic information is blocked from entering the phonological store through an articulatory suppression manipulation (counting out loud while reading the brand names), the phonetic symbolism effect is eliminated.



Citation:

L. J. Shrum and Tina M. Lowrey (2008) ,"Effects of Articulatory Suppression on Phonetic Symbolism Effects on Brand Name Preference", in LA - Latin American Advances in Consumer Research Volume 2, eds. Claudia R. Acevedo, Jose Mauro C. Hernandez, and Tina M. Lowrey, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 8--9.

Authors

L. J. Shrum, University of Texas at San Antonio
Tina M. Lowrey, University of Texas at San Antonio



Volume

LA - Latin American Advances in Consumer Research Volume 2 | 2008



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