Attitudes Towards Globalization in an Emerging (Dominican Republic) Versus a Developed (U.S.A.) Market

This exploratory study examines the effects of consumer ethnocentrism, collectivism and level of economic development on attitudes towards globalization. Further, the study explores the levels of consumer ethnocentrism and collectivism in the Dominican Republic, a country that has received scant attention in the literature. Empirical support was found for the hypotheses that individuals showing higher levels of consumer ethnocentrism and collectivism exhibit less favorable attitudes towards globalization. In addition, support was established for the hypothesis that individuals in an emerging market (Dominican Republic) had less favorable attitudes towards globalization than those in a developed one (U.S.A.). The research and practical implications are discussed.



Citation:

MICHAEL CHATTALAS and YANELY REYES (2008) ,"Attitudes Towards Globalization in an Emerging (Dominican Republic) Versus a Developed (U.S.A.) Market", in LA - Latin American Advances in Consumer Research Volume 2, eds. Claudia R. Acevedo, Jose Mauro C. Hernandez, and Tina M. Lowrey, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 224-225.

Authors

MICHAEL CHATTALAS, Fordham University, USA
YANELY REYES, GoldmanSachs, USA



Volume

LA - Latin American Advances in Consumer Research Volume 2 | 2008



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