The Effects of Negative Emotions Provoked By a Shocking Ad on Drinking and Driving: Measurement of Emotions With Izard’S Scale

This research studies the effects of nine basic emotions activated by a shocking message on drinking and driving and measured by Izard's Scale. We assume that fear, shame, guilt, distress, anger, disgust, contempt, surprise and interest have positive and direct effects on persuasion. Results show that emotion measures constitute 4 dimensions. The first is called “primary emotions”, and is composed of items related to fear, anger, and sadness. The second, named “secondary emotions” is measured by items from shame and guilt. The third dimension is “contempt/disgust” and the fourth is “surprise”. Results show that primary emotions and “contempt/disgust” have direct effects on persuasion. Surprisingly, the effect of contempt/disgust on persuasion is negative. This research shows also that perceived self-efficacy favours persuasion.



Citation:

Imene Becheur, Hayan Dib, and Pierre Valette-Florence (2008) ,"The Effects of Negative Emotions Provoked By a Shocking Ad on Drinking and Driving: Measurement of Emotions With Izard’S Scale", in LA - Latin American Advances in Consumer Research Volume 2, eds. Claudia R. Acevedo, Jose Mauro C. Hernandez, and Tina M. Lowrey, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 205-206.

Authors

Imene Becheur, Wesford School of Business, Grenoble, France
Hayan Dib, Wesford School of Business, Grenoble, France
Pierre Valette-Florence, University Pierre Mendes France, IAE Grenoble, France



Volume

LA - Latin American Advances in Consumer Research Volume 2 | 2008



Share Proceeding

Featured papers

See More

Featured

Collaborative Work as Catalyst for Market Formation: The Case of the Ancestral Health Market

Burcak Ertimur, Fairleigh Dickinson University
Steven Chen, California State University, Fullerton

Read More

Featured

Communicate Healthiness Through Indirect Measures: The Effect of Food in Motion Figure on the Perceived Healthiness of Food

Moty Amar, Ono Academic College (OAC)
Yaniv Gvili, Ono Academic College (OAC)
Aner Tal, Ono Academic College (OAC)

Read More

Featured

Attribution of Authenticity: The Benefits of Self-Disclosure of Unfavorable Information

Li Jiang, Carnegie Mellon University, USA
Maryam Kouchaki, Northeastern University, USA
Francesca Gino, Harvard Business School, USA

Read More

Engage with Us

Becoming an Association for Consumer Research member is simple. Membership in ACR is relatively inexpensive, but brings significant benefits to its members.