Donating to Arts Institutions As Reciprocating

Literature on donating to arts institutions fails in thoroughly explaining the phenomenon since it has investigated it from the point of view of rewards as incentive to donate. We propose that individuals donate to arts institutions for reciprocating something they perceive to have previously received by the art institution. Thus, a sense of indebtedness and reciprocating generates donating to arts institutions, at least when we consider anonymous donations of small amount. An experimental design tests the basic relationship. Need for self esteem, being keen on arts, need for belonging, perceived efficacy of donating, attitude towards donating, social validation, geographical proximity and type of institution, act as moderator variables.



Citation:

Armando Cirrincione, Francois Colbert, and Alain D'Astous (2007) ,"Donating to Arts Institutions As Reciprocating", in E - European Advances in Consumer Research Volume 8, eds. Stefania Borghini, Mary Ann McGrath, and Cele Otnes, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 293-295.

Authors

Armando Cirrincione, Bocconi University, Italy
Francois Colbert, HEC Montreal, Canada
Alain D'Astous, HEC Montreal, Canada



Volume

E - European Advances in Consumer Research Volume 8 | 2007



Share Proceeding

Featured papers

See More

Featured

Consumer Responses to Premium Framing: Better to Offer the Target Product as a Free Gift?

Maggie Wenjing Liu, Tsinghua University
Lu Yang, Tsinghua University
Yuhuang Zheng, Tsinghua University

Read More

Featured

J8. Exchange with The Rich, Concern with The Poor: The Effects of Social Class on Consumer Response to Brand Relationship

Bing Han, Shanghai Jiao Tong University
Liangyan Wang, Shanghai Jiao Tong University

Read More

Featured

Names Are the Mirrors of the Soul: The Role of Possessive Brand Names in Brand Evaluations

Marina Puzakova, Lehigh University
Mansur Khamitov, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore

Read More

Engage with Us

Becoming an Association for Consumer Research member is simple. Membership in ACR is relatively inexpensive, but brings significant benefits to its members.