Ingredient Branding Alliances: an Investigation of Brand Awareness and Feedback Effects

    An Experiment was conducted in Taiwan to test the general hypothesis of feedback effects on an ingredient branding alliance. Results showed that the low-awareness brand benefited more from the successful alliance than the high-awareness brand, but the high-awareness brand was harmed more severely than the low-awareness brand in failure situation when the partner brand was given. In addition, we also found that the relative feedback effect on the host brand and the ingredient brand, respectively, depended on the brand awareness of two brands in the alliance in a successful or failure condition. The present research holds important implications for co-branding strategy.



Citation:

Yung-Chien Lou, Meng-Chun Tsai, and Xiu-Hua Yan (2007) ,"Ingredient Branding Alliances: an Investigation of Brand Awareness and Feedback Effects", in E - European Advances in Consumer Research Volume 8, eds. Stefania Borghini, Mary Ann McGrath, and Cele Otnes, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 232-233.

Authors

Yung-Chien Lou, Department of Business Administration, National Chengchi University, Taiwan (R.O.C.)
Meng-Chun Tsai, Department of Business Administration, National Chengchi University, Taiwan (R.O.C.)
Xiu-Hua Yan, BenQ Corporation, Taiwan (R.O.C.)



Volume

E - European Advances in Consumer Research Volume 8 | 2007



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