Mercury Warning Disclosure Efficacy on Consumer Beliefs and Purchase Intentions of Fish

Mercury Warning Disclosure Efficacy on Consumer Beliefs and Purchase Intentions of Fish ABSTRACT The purpose of this research is to examine warning disclosure efficacy in the context of a healthful product, tuna fish. While the health benefits of tuna fish and fish in general are well documented, potential risks are somewhat unknown to consumers. The research also examines warning disclosure efficacy between two consumer groups, (1) “those considered at-risk for mercury overexposure, and (2) the general population. These results suggest that a warning disclosure for this product informs both groups of consumers about the negative aspects, while not affecting perceptions of healthfulness. Implications for warning disclosure literature and the fish industry are discussed.



Citation:

Jill K. Maher, Renee Shaw Hughner, and Nancy Childs (2007) ,"Mercury Warning Disclosure Efficacy on Consumer Beliefs and Purchase Intentions of Fish", in E - European Advances in Consumer Research Volume 8, eds. Stefania Borghini, Mary Ann McGrath, and Cele Otnes, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 337-338.

Authors

Jill K. Maher, Robert Morris University, USA
Renee Shaw Hughner, Arizona State University, USA
Nancy Childs, Saint joseph's University, USA



Volume

E - European Advances in Consumer Research Volume 8 | 2007



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