Smoking Can't Hurt Me! and Other Death-Related Thoughts: a Test of Terror Management and Risk Perceptions

Researchers are plagued with creating communications that can increase compliance with risk avoidance behaviors. A field experiment was designed to investigate the impact of mortality salience and self-esteem (TMT) on smokers’ willingness to comply with anti-smoking messages using health and social themes. “Social mortality”, emphasizing the loss of a relationship when one dies (as opposed to the health effects of smoking), was more effective at getting a wide range of smokers to indicate an intention to quit smoking. Our results show that mortality salience interacts with self-esteem to influence smoking tendencies. The public policy and theoretical implications of these findings are discussed.



Citation:

Ingrid M. Martin and Michael Kamins (2007) ,"Smoking Can't Hurt Me! and Other Death-Related Thoughts: a Test of Terror Management and Risk Perceptions", in E - European Advances in Consumer Research Volume 8, eds. Stefania Borghini, Mary Ann McGrath, and Cele Otnes, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 72-72.

Authors

Ingrid M. Martin, California State University-Long Beach, USA
Michael Kamins, University of Southern California, USA



Volume

E - European Advances in Consumer Research Volume 8 | 2007



Share Proceeding

Featured papers

See More

Featured

B8. Factors Influencing Collaborative Consumption Usage in the US market: An Exploratory Study

Pia Annette Albinsson, Appalachian State University
B. Yasanthi Perera, Brock University, Canada
Bidisha Burman, University of Mary Washington
Lubna Nafees, Appalachian State University

Read More

Featured

Secret Consumption in Close Relationships

Kelley Gullo, Duke University, USA
Danielle J Brick, University of New Hampshire
Gavan Fitzsimons, Duke University, USA

Read More

Featured

Powerful Buy Time: Why Social Power Leads to Prioritizing Time over Money

Myungjin Chung, University of Texas at Arlington
Ritesh Saini, University of Texas at Arlington

Read More

Engage with Us

Becoming an Association for Consumer Research member is simple. Membership in ACR is relatively inexpensive, but brings significant benefits to its members.