Jack Daniel’S America: Iconic Brands As Ideological Parasites and Proselytizers

Branding is often viewed as a form of ideological influence, but how brands impact ideology has not been carefully specified. I use a genealogical study of the emergence of Jack Daniel’s Whiskey as an iconic brand to specify the ideological role played by such brands in relation to other producers of ideological change, particularly the other culture industries. I demonstrate that brands play a distinctive role, quite different from that critics have described: brands act as parasites riding the coat-tails of other more powerful cultural forms, but then use their market power to proselytize these ideological revisions. Through ubiquity and repetition, brands transform emergent culture into dominant norms.



Citation:

Douglas Holt (2007) ,"Jack Daniel’S America: Iconic Brands As Ideological Parasites and Proselytizers", in E - European Advances in Consumer Research Volume 8, eds. Stefania Borghini, Mary Ann McGrath, and Cele Otnes, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 145-149.

Authors

Douglas Holt, United Kingdom



Volume

E - European Advances in Consumer Research Volume 8 | 2007



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