The Weight of the World: Consuming Traditional Masculine Ideologies

This paper explores the relationship between the body, masculinity and the consumption of body-focussed activities. It examines the meaning and importance of strength training for men. Strength training is of interest because its increase in popularity is occurring at a particular point in time when a growing number of men are experiencing insecurities over their masculine identities as a result of recent socio-economic changes. This paper proposes that men today are facing a dilemma in terms of masculine identity. This dilemma hinges on the growing objectification of the male body in the media and its cultural messages regarding masculinity.



Citation:

Andrew Dunne, Olivia Freeman, and Roger Sherlock (2005) ,"The Weight of the World: Consuming Traditional Masculine Ideologies", in E - European Advances in Consumer Research Volume 7, eds. Karin M. Ekstrom and Helene Brembeck, Goteborg, Sweden : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 138-142.

Authors

Andrew Dunne, Dublin Institute of Technology
Olivia Freeman, Dublin Institute of Technology
Roger Sherlock, Dublin Institute of Technology



Volume

E - European Advances in Consumer Research Volume 7 | 2005



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