Home Confined Consumers: Identity Continuities and Discontinuities

Consumers confined to the home through disability or long term illness are unable to access the marketplace directly and consume through the socialization process. The consumption situation of home bound individuals is the concern of this study, specifically, issues of consumer (re) socialization and consumer identity post home confinement. The research focuses on possessions, with respect to meanings, role and the process of socialization in relation to identity. Findings indicate that the nostalgic consumption of possessions offers the ability to (re)construct the self- identity after confinement. Additionally, possessions afford opportunities to maintain continuity with former ableist identities after the discontinuity of enforced marketplace withdrawal. An individual case study illustrates this point.



Citation:

Hilary Downey and Miriam Catterall (2005) ,"Home Confined Consumers: Identity Continuities and Discontinuities", in E - European Advances in Consumer Research Volume 7, eds. Karin M. Ekstrom and Helene Brembeck, Goteborg, Sweden : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 577-581.

Authors

Hilary Downey, Queens University Belfast
Miriam Catterall, Queens University Belfast



Volume

E - European Advances in Consumer Research Volume 7 | 2005



Share Proceeding

Featured papers

See More

Featured

Too Much of a Good Thing? Consumer Response to Changes in Brand Essence

Tarje Gaustad, Kristiania University College
Bendik Samuelsen, BI Norwegian Business School
Luk Warlop, Norwegian School of Management, Norway
Gavan Fitzsimons, Duke University, USA

Read More

Featured

F11. Anti-Consumption for Sustainability: The Environmental Impact of Anti-Consumption Lifestyles, Environmentally Concerned Individuals and Ethical Consumers

Laurie Touchette, HEC Montreal, Canada
Marcelo Vinhal Nepomuceno, HEC Montreal, Canada

Read More

Featured

On Politics, Morality, and Consumer Response to Negative Publicity

Chethana Achar, University of Washington, USA
Nidhi Agrawal, University of Washington, USA

Read More

Engage with Us

Becoming an Association for Consumer Research member is simple. Membership in ACR is relatively inexpensive, but brings significant benefits to its members.