Coping With Making and Maintaining Dietary Change: a Comparative Study

Within social marketing studies there is a limited understanding as to why it is that some people make and maintain behaviour change and others do not (Andreasen, 2003). This paper looks at the issues with behaviour change for people who make changes to their diet triggered by a medical diagnostic test. The specific focus of the paper explores the coping strategies people put into place (Folkman et al, 1986). and compares the strategies of: people who have made changes to their diet and have maintained these changes & people who made very limited changes or none at all.



Citation:

Liz Logie-Maciver, Maria Piacentini, and Douglas Eadie (2005) ,"Coping With Making and Maintaining Dietary Change: a Comparative Study", in E - European Advances in Consumer Research Volume 7, eds. Karin M. Ekstrom and Helene Brembeck, Goteborg, Sweden : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 536-541.

Authors

Liz Logie-Maciver, Napier University, Edinburgh, Scotland
Maria Piacentini, Lancaster University, Lancaster, England
Douglas Eadie, Strathclyde University, Glasgow, Scotland



Volume

E - European Advances in Consumer Research Volume 7 | 2005



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