Consumer Cognition At the Point of Sale: Results From a Process Tracing Study

Video-cued thought protocols were examined as a method for process tracing of cognition at the point of sale. 128 customers participated in the study. Correlations between data on cognitions and behavioral data indicate convergent and discriminant validity. Dependent on motivational state, customers differ in the way they process information. Customers with a particular intention to buy are mainly concerned with realizing their goals. Browsing customers are more open-minded towards new information. Furthermore, data on cognitions are able to predict the final purchase decision. The results suggest that video-cued thought protocols are a useful technique for consumer research.



Citation:

Oliver B. Buttner, Manuel Rauch, and Gunter Silberer (2005) ,"Consumer Cognition At the Point of Sale: Results From a Process Tracing Study", in E - European Advances in Consumer Research Volume 7, eds. Karin M. Ekstrom and Helene Brembeck, Goteborg, Sweden : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 557-558.

Authors

Oliver B. Buttner, Georg-August University of Gottingen, Institute of Marketing and Retailing
Manuel Rauch, Georg-August University of Gottingen, Institute of Marketing and Retailing
Gunter Silberer, Georg-August University of Gottingen, Institute of Marketing and Retailing



Volume

E - European Advances in Consumer Research Volume 7 | 2005



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