Involving Users in Service Design: User Experience Vs. User Expectations

Traditionally, users have been brought into the development process by companies developing the products. There is a growing interest to apply and further develop these methods used in business-to-business contexts, and invent new ones. The term “user involvement” incoporates very different methods to actually involving users. The ways in which users are involved in product development affect the type of user information obtained. This paper reviewed two cases in which consumers were involved in two distinctly different ways. As a central dimension, we focused on users as a source of experiences vs. users as a source of expectations.



Citation:

Eva Heiskanen, Ilpo Koskinen, and Petteri Repo (2005) ,"Involving Users in Service Design: User Experience Vs. User Expectations", in E - European Advances in Consumer Research Volume 7, eds. Karin M. Ekstrom and Helene Brembeck, Goteborg, Sweden : Association for Consumer Research.

Authors

Eva Heiskanen, National Consumer Research Centre
Ilpo Koskinen, University of Art and Design
Petteri Repo, National Consumer Research Centre



Volume

E - European Advances in Consumer Research Volume 7 | 2005



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