Brand Switching As a Function of Variety Seeking Behavior and Product Characteristics: Testing the Hoyer and Ridgway Model

This paper examines brand switching propensity as a function of variety seeking levels and product characteristics (objective and perceived) in the context of apparel purchases. A number of measures are developed to capture variety seeking levels and the perceived product characteristics which include involvement, perceived risk, brand loyalty, brand similarity and hedonism. Multiple regression is used to test the hypothesis that brand switching propensity in apparel is a function of variety seeking and product characteristics. Findings indicate that variety-seeking and product characteristics do not seem to explain brand switching propensity, and highlight the need for further research.



Citation:

Nina Michaelidou and Sally Dibb (2005) ,"Brand Switching As a Function of Variety Seeking Behavior and Product Characteristics: Testing the Hoyer and Ridgway Model", in E - European Advances in Consumer Research Volume 7, eds. Karin M. Ekstrom and Helene Brembeck, Goteborg, Sweden : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 518-519.

Authors

Nina Michaelidou, University of Nottingham Business School, UK
Sally Dibb, University of Warwick Business School, UK



Volume

E - European Advances in Consumer Research Volume 7 | 2005



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