The Sins of the Father Shall Be Visited Upon the Sons: the Effect of Corporate Parent Affiliation on Consumers’ Perceptions of Corporate Societal Marketing

This research investigates how affiliation with a corporate parent affects consumers’ perception of corporate societal marketing (CSM). It also examines whether this effect is more pronounced when the affiliation is perceived to be hidden, and therefore in violation of the norm of openness. Lastly, the study examines whether any of the effects flow back to the parent company. Findings include that corporate parent affiliation does not necessarily lead to decreased evaluations of the niche marketer brands. However, when consumers see the affiliation as hidden, evaluations are negatively affected. Evidence suggests effects may depend on prior track record of parent firm.



Citation:

Andrew Wilson and Peter Darke (2008) ,"The Sins of the Father Shall Be Visited Upon the Sons: the Effect of Corporate Parent Affiliation on Consumers’ Perceptions of Corporate Societal Marketing", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 35, eds. Angela Y. Lee and Dilip Soman, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: .

Authors

Andrew Wilson, Florida State University
Peter Darke, Florida State University



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 35 | 2008



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