Unsuccessful Purchase Experiences and Future Consumer Decisions: Effects of Initial Goal Setting Processes and Counterfactual Thoughts

It was hypothesized that a failure experience in the initial goal pursuit task might increase preparation for a subsequent future decision and that the effect is moderated by the goal setting processes during the initial task. These expectations were confirmed both in anagram solving situations (experiments 1) and in consumer purchase decision situations (experiment 2). In addition, the effect was mediated by the amount of upward (vs. downward) counterfactual thoughts generated in response to the failure. Finally, the effect was quite independent of the level of affect that participants experienced after the failure.



Citation:

June-Hee Na, Jong-Won Park, and Kwanho Suk (2008) ,"Unsuccessful Purchase Experiences and Future Consumer Decisions: Effects of Initial Goal Setting Processes and Counterfactual Thoughts", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 35, eds. Angela Y. Lee and Dilip Soman, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 276-281.

Authors

June-Hee Na, Chungju National University, Korea
Jong-Won Park, Korea University, Korea
Kwanho Suk, Korea University, Korea



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 35 | 2008



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