Is High-Caloric Food Consumption an Addictive Behavior in Our Modern World of Plenty? a Test of the Relationship Between Performance in a Neuropsychological Positive-Emotion Shifting Task and Everyday Snacking Behavior in Non-Obese Adult Women

In order to examine the degree to which high caloric food (HCF) consumption conform to an addiction-like model, 132 non-obese adult women engaged in a two-phase study in which they first performed the affective shifting task (AST) and subsequently reported their HCF snacking behavior and craving in an experience sampling study. Individual indices for attentional and inhibitory performance were derived from the AST and served as predictors of the person’s snacking, craving, and the weight of craving carried in snacking. Results showed that a women’s inhibitory performance in AST could account for her everyday HCF snacking consumption.



Citation:

Ji Lu, Laurette Dube, and Antoine Bechara (2008) ,"Is High-Caloric Food Consumption an Addictive Behavior in Our Modern World of Plenty? a Test of the Relationship Between Performance in a Neuropsychological Positive-Emotion Shifting Task and Everyday Snacking Behavior in Non-Obese Adult Women", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 35, eds. Angela Y. Lee and Dilip Soman, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 847-849.

Authors

Ji Lu, McGill University, Canada
Laurette Dube, McGill University, Canada
Antoine Bechara, University of Southern California



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 35 | 2008



Share Proceeding

Featured papers

See More

Featured

E2. Donation versus Adoption: How the Mode of Helping Moderates the Effect of Emotions on Helping

Ziqi Shang, Renmin University of China
Xiuping Li, National University of Singapore, Singapore
aradhna krishna, University of Michigan, USA

Read More

Featured

Consumer Reluctance Toward Medical Artificial Intelligence: The Underlying Role of Uniqueness Neglect

Chiara Longoni, Boston University, USA
Andrea Bonezzi, New York University, USA
Carey K. Morewedge, Boston University, USA

Read More

Featured

L7. The Joy of Shopping: Reconciling Mixed Effects of Positive Emotions on Shopping Behavior

Kelley Gullo, Duke University, USA
Duncan Simester, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA
Gavan Fitzsimons, Duke University, USA

Read More

Engage with Us

Becoming an Association for Consumer Research member is simple. Membership in ACR is relatively inexpensive, but brings significant benefits to its members.