Why Might One Feel Guilty For Giving a Homeless Guy a Dollar? the Effects of Endowment, Peer Awareness and Guilt on Charitable Giving

In this research, a series of experiments will be presented that demonstrate the phenomenon of “take-aversion” -- that taking away from charity (choosing to undo a donation) looms larger than not giving (choosing not to make a donation). The studies presented control for status-quo bias and audience effects and focus on the mediating role of guilt in the phenomenon of take-aversion. The research also compares the take-aversion and guilt associated with transferring money from one charity to another charity to the take-aversion and guilt associated with transferring money from a charity to oneself.



Citation:

Michal Strahilevitz (2008) ,"Why Might One Feel Guilty For Giving a Homeless Guy a Dollar? the Effects of Endowment, Peer Awareness and Guilt on Charitable Giving", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 35, eds. Angela Y. Lee and Dilip Soman, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 246-248.

Authors

Michal Strahilevitz, Golden Gate University



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 35 | 2008



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