Asymmetric Effects of Counteractive Control

Counteractive control theory predicts that goals decrease the motivational strength of tempting alternatives, whereas temptations increase the motivational strength of goal-related alternatives. We explore these asymmetric effects on motivation in three studies that tested for evaluations, predictions and performance. Study 1 finds that dieters devalue fatty foods and augment the value of healthy foods. Study 2 finds that individuals in a committed relationship devalue the perceived attractiveness of alternative partners and augment the attractiveness of their own partner. Study 3 finds that students set optimistic predictions of spending more time on academic activities and less time on leisure activities. These evaluations and predictions determine performance.



Citation:

Ayelet Fishbach, Ying Zhang, and Kristian Myrseth (2008) ,"Asymmetric Effects of Counteractive Control", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 35, eds. Angela Y. Lee and Dilip Soman, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 217-220.

Authors

Ayelet Fishbach, University of Chicago
Ying Zhang, University of Texas, Austin
Kristian Myrseth, University of Chicago



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 35 | 2008



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