Anticipating Consumption: the Impact of Expectations on Decision-Making For Healthy Products

This two-part study offers an examination of the construct of consumer expectations within the context of making purchases for health-related products. In the first experiment, we find that internally-derived expectations can sometimes be detrimental to decision making because these self generated expectations can override the “objective” evidence of the product’s performance. In the second experiment, we find a persistent interaction effect such that when individuals approach a decision making task from an affective or experiential processing frame, they discount the validity of scientific reports in favor of their own pre-conceived expectations. Implications for public policy makers are discussed.



Citation:

Diane M. Phillips, Jason Keith Phillips, and Nancy Childs (2008) ,"Anticipating Consumption: the Impact of Expectations on Decision-Making For Healthy Products", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 35, eds. Angela Y. Lee and Dilip Soman, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 1001-1003.

Authors

Diane M. Phillips, Saint Joseph's University
Jason Keith Phillips, West Chester University
Nancy Childs, Saint Joseph's University



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 35 | 2008



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