When Images and Words Don’T Agree, Images Win: the Shielding Effect of Imagination on Attitude Change

This study proposes that imagery-provoking product descriptions, compared to pallid ones (e.g., ratings of a product), lead to attitudes that are more resistant to opposing analytically-presented information. To test this hypothesis, we conducted a study in which participants were presented with two conflicting pieces of information about a product. A significant primacy effect was found when the first evaluation was imagery-provoking and the second analytically-presented but not when both evaluations were presented in an analytical format. This effect appeared to be mediated by the greater amount of cognitive elaboration generated by the imagery-provoking message.



Citation:

Massimiliano Ostinelli and Ulf Bockenholt (2008) ,"When Images and Words Don’T Agree, Images Win: the Shielding Effect of Imagination on Attitude Change", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 35, eds. Angela Y. Lee and Dilip Soman, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 977-978.

Authors

Massimiliano Ostinelli, McGill University, Canada
Ulf Bockenholt, McGill University, Canada



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 35 | 2008



Share Proceeding

Featured papers

See More

Featured

Algorithm Attraction versus Aversion: The Role of the Perceived Self-Efficacy of the Decision Maker

Gizem Yalcin, Erasmus University Rotterdam, The Netherlands
Anne-Kathrin Klesse, Erasmus University Rotterdam, The Netherlands
Darren Dahl, University of British Columbia, Canada

Read More

Featured

The “Break-in” Effect: A Token Gesture Can Increase Task Initiation and Prevent Goal Abandonment

Adelle Xue Yang, National University of Singapore, Singapore
Babu Gounder, University of Miami, USA
Rajesh Bagchi, Virginia Tech, USA

Read More

Featured

M13. Keep Consistency in Good Old Days: The Effect of Nostalgia on Consumers' Consistency Seeking Behavior

Yafeng Fan, Tsinghua University
Jing Jiang, Renmin University of China

Read More

Engage with Us

Becoming an Association for Consumer Research member is simple. Membership in ACR is relatively inexpensive, but brings significant benefits to its members.