Proximity to Or Progress Toward Receiving a Telephone Service? An Experimental Investigation of Customer Reactions to Features of Telephone Auditory Messages

Using an experimental simulation we examined caller reactions to features of telephone auditory messages. Callers waiting on hold received information about their location in the queue (number of people ahead of them). Caller reactions measured were level of satisfaction and abandonment rate. The experimental design held the duration of the wait constant, and created two queue lengths (long and short) and two update frequencies (high and low). Results show that longer queues lead to more satisfaction but also to higher abandonment than shorter queues. The effects of queue length on satisfaction and persistence were explained through sense of progress and sense of proximity, respectively, of the people waiting.



Citation:

Liad Weiss, Anat Rafaeli, and Nira Munichor (2008) ,"Proximity to Or Progress Toward Receiving a Telephone Service? An Experimental Investigation of Customer Reactions to Features of Telephone Auditory Messages", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 35, eds. Angela Y. Lee and Dilip Soman, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 791-792.

Authors

Liad Weiss, Columbia University
Anat Rafaeli, Israel Institute of Technology, Israel
Nira Munichor, Israel Institute of Technology, Israel



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 35 | 2008



Share Proceeding

Featured papers

See More

Featured

Mediation as a Multi-Dimensional Process of Brand-Related Interaction

Serena Wider, Copenhagen Business School
Andrea Lucarelli, Lund University
Sylvia Wallpach, Copenhagen Business School

Read More

Featured

Ritual Scholarship in Marketing: Past, Present and Future

Cele Otnes, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA
Linda Tuncay Zayer, Loyola University Chicago, USA
Robert Arias, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA
Arun Sreekumar, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA

Read More

Featured

L12. Should I Stay or Should I Go: When Our Companies Have Eyes for Other Consumers

Na Ri Yoon, Indiana University, USA
Jenny Olson, Indiana University, USA
Adam Duhachek, Indiana University, USA

Read More

Engage with Us

Becoming an Association for Consumer Research member is simple. Membership in ACR is relatively inexpensive, but brings significant benefits to its members.