Proximity to Or Progress Toward Receiving a Telephone Service? An Experimental Investigation of Customer Reactions to Features of Telephone Auditory Messages

Using an experimental simulation we examined caller reactions to features of telephone auditory messages. Callers waiting on hold received information about their location in the queue (number of people ahead of them). Caller reactions measured were level of satisfaction and abandonment rate. The experimental design held the duration of the wait constant, and created two queue lengths (long and short) and two update frequencies (high and low). Results show that longer queues lead to more satisfaction but also to higher abandonment than shorter queues. The effects of queue length on satisfaction and persistence were explained through sense of progress and sense of proximity, respectively, of the people waiting.



Citation:

Liad Weiss, Anat Rafaeli, and Nira Munichor (2008) ,"Proximity to Or Progress Toward Receiving a Telephone Service? An Experimental Investigation of Customer Reactions to Features of Telephone Auditory Messages", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 35, eds. Angela Y. Lee and Dilip Soman, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 791-792.

Authors

Liad Weiss, Columbia University
Anat Rafaeli, Israel Institute of Technology, Israel
Nira Munichor, Israel Institute of Technology, Israel



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 35 | 2008



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