The Validating Effects of Power: Implications For Consumer Persuasion

The present research examines how power affects consumers’ response to persuasive messages. In line with prior research suggesting a link between power and approach tendencies, we hypothesized that having power increases confidence relative to being powerless. Based on prior work on confidence, we anticipated power could have two different consequences for persuasion depending on whether it was induced before or after message processing. Consistent with this hypothesis, when power was induced before message processing it affected the amount of message processing. However, when power was induced after message processing it affected the extent to which consumers relied on their thoughts.



Citation:

Pablo Brinol, Richard Petty, and Carmen Valle (2008) ,"The Validating Effects of Power: Implications For Consumer Persuasion", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 35, eds. Angela Y. Lee and Dilip Soman, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 194-197.

Authors

Pablo Brinol, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Spain
Richard Petty, Ohio State University
Carmen Valle, Universidad San Pablo Ceu, Spain



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 35 | 2008



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