Could Ralph Nader’S Exit Have Helped Al Gore? the Impact of Decoy Entry and Exit on Consumer Choice

Individuals often need to make a new choice after a preferred option becomes unavailable. Does the exit of an option from a choice set return the shares of the original options to the status quo ante? In three experiments, we observe that when an option turns out to be unselectable following a decision problem in which it was selectable, the shares of the remaining options are predictably different, relative to a setting in which the option was unselectable to start with. The presence of the additional option likely changes the importance of the decision criteria, thus influencing subsequent choice shares.



Citation:

William Hedgcock, Akshay Rao, and Haipeng (Allan) Chen (2008) ,"Could Ralph Nader’S Exit Have Helped Al Gore? the Impact of Decoy Entry and Exit on Consumer Choice", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 35, eds. Angela Y. Lee and Dilip Soman, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 173-175.

Authors

William Hedgcock, University of Minnesota
Akshay Rao, University of Minnesota and Hong Kong University of Science & Technology, China
Haipeng (Allan) Chen, Texas A & M University



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 35 | 2008



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