Mispredicting Adaptation and the Consequences of Unwanted Disruptions: When Advertisements Improve Television

Though they have trouble predicting it, people adapt to most positive experiences. Consequently, an experience with a marvelous start can have a mild ending. If the experience is disrupted, however, the intensity can be prolonged, making the experience more enjoyable. Four studies found support for the hypothesis that disrupting television programs can make these programs more enjoyable. Although consumers thought that advertising disruptions would be aversive, they actually made the program more enjoyable to watch (Study 1). Subsequent studies showed that this was not due to evaluative contrast effects (Study 2) or the mere presence of advertisements (Study 3), and in fact could emerge with non-advertising disruptions (Study 4).



Citation:

Leif D. Nelson, Tom Meyvis, and Jeff Galak (2008) ,"Mispredicting Adaptation and the Consequences of Unwanted Disruptions: When Advertisements Improve Television", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 35, eds. Angela Y. Lee and Dilip Soman, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 89-92.

Authors

Leif D. Nelson, New York University, USA
Tom Meyvis, New York University, USA
Jeff Galak, New York University, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 35 | 2008



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