Consequences of Co-Creation in Fantasy-Based Consumption Communities: Netnographic Analysis of a Live Action Role Playing Organization

Fantasy is frequently an essential component of consumption (Kozinets 2001, Martin 2004). Additionally, co-creation of value (Prahalad and Ramaswamy 2004) has emerged as a critical concept to understand how consumers create and extract value from exchange. We conducted a netnographic analysis of a live action role playing (LARP) organization to investigate how co-creation is negotiated between marketer, consumer, and consumption communities in a fantasy context. Results indicate that achieving co-creation is an important component of consumer satisfaction during fantasy consumption and that conflict between community and marketer emerges when co-creation is not achieved. Evidence suggested that one recourse to this conflict is for a consumption community to utilize its own resources to co-create between members, thereby retaining loyalty to community and brand.



Citation:

Andrew Baker and Carolyn Curasi (2008) ,"Consequences of Co-Creation in Fantasy-Based Consumption Communities: Netnographic Analysis of a Live Action Role Playing Organization", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 35, eds. Angela Y. Lee and Dilip Soman, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 44-48.

Authors

Andrew Baker, Georgia State University
Carolyn Curasi, Georgia State University



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 35 | 2008



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