Tracing Cognitive Processes At the Point of Sale: New Developments and a Comparison of Methods

The authors discuss two methods (thinking aloud and video-cued thought protocols) for tracing consumers’ cognitive processes at the point of purchase and present modified procedures that take advantage of recent technological developments. The reactivity of these methods was examined in a field study (N = 130) that applied a 3 (method) x 2 (motivational orientation) design. Reactivity was more pronounced in the two process tracing groups than in a control group; nevertheless, video-cued thought protocols produced less reactivity than thinking aloud. The results provide guidance for future process tracing research at the point of purchase.



Citation:

Oliver B. Buettner and Guenter Silberer (2008) ,"Tracing Cognitive Processes At the Point of Sale: New Developments and a Comparison of Methods", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 35, eds. Angela Y. Lee and Dilip Soman, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 671-672.

Authors

Oliver B. Buettner, Georg-August-Universitaet Goettingen, Germany
Guenter Silberer, Georg-August-Universitaet Goettingen, Germany



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 35 | 2008



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