Keeping It in the Family: How Teenagers Use Music to Bond, Build Bridges and Seek Autonomy

This paper seeks to explore teenage use and consumption of music within families and to develop the concepts of ‘connection’ and autonomy seeking within families relative to popular music consumption. Social trends indicate that the composition of the family will continue to change and, as such, this research will also examine the impact of changing family structures on music use and consumption. This research involved 24 in-depth interviews with both early and late adolescents. The findings from this research sample suggest connection (bonding and building bridges) through music is most relevant for teenagers raised in step parent families. Evidence of affinity or autonomy seeking behaviour may also be ascribed to family type.



Citation:

Peter Nuttall and Julie Tinson (2008) ,"Keeping It in the Family: How Teenagers Use Music to Bond, Build Bridges and Seek Autonomy", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 35, eds. Angela Y. Lee and Dilip Soman, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 450-456.

Authors

Peter Nuttall, University of the West of England, Bristol, UK
Julie Tinson, Stirling University, Scotland, UK



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 35 | 2008



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