Getting Begets Wanting: a New Theory About Long-Term Changes in Strength of Motivation

Prior theories of motivation, based on the satiation cycle, propose that satisfaction reduces subsequent motivational drive. A new theory proposes that this occurs only in the short-run, and that motivation conforms to a “getting begets wanting” pattern in the long-run. In three studies, we demonstrate that “getting” (that is, engaging in a motivational endeavor) strengthens later motivation in that domain. We tested this theory in the contexts of crossword puzzles, handheld video games, napping, and news-related behaviors, and found that engaging in an activity increased motivation to engage in it subsequently.



Citation:

Kathleen Vohs and Andrew Kaikati (2008) ,"Getting Begets Wanting: a New Theory About Long-Term Changes in Strength of Motivation", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 35, eds. Angela Y. Lee and Dilip Soman, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 913-913.

Authors

Kathleen Vohs, University of Minnesota
Andrew Kaikati, University of Minnesota



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 35 | 2008



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