Avoiding the Debt Trap: How Attributional Retraining Can Influence Consumers’ Perceived Control Over and Behavioural Intentions Towards Debt

This paper addresses a pressing need to identify factors that may reduce individuals’ propensity to accumulate debt. Across three experimental studies, the paper shows that attributional retraining can affect both attributions of control regarding debt accumulation and intentions to incur debt; that more credible sources are not necessarily more effective in delivering attributional retraining messages; and that the perceived motive of a source moderates the impact of source credibility on effectiveness of delivering attributional retraining messages.



Citation:

Kelley Main, Mei-Ling Wei, and Eileen Fischer (2008) ,"Avoiding the Debt Trap: How Attributional Retraining Can Influence Consumers’ Perceived Control Over and Behavioural Intentions Towards Debt", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 35, eds. Angela Y. Lee and Dilip Soman, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 654-655.

Authors

Kelley Main, University of Manitoba, Canada
Mei-Ling Wei, Ryerson University, Canada
Eileen Fischer, York University, Canada



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 35 | 2008



Share Proceeding

Featured papers

See More

Featured

O12. When do People Waste Time? Testing a Mechanism for Parkinson’s Law.

Holly S Howe, Duke University, USA
Tanya Chartrand, Duke University, USA

Read More

Featured

To Apologize, or Not to Apologize? That is A Question - How Should an Organization Respond to Executive Employees’ Private Life Misconduct?

Zayed Bin Islam, University of Guelph, Canada
Juan Wang, University of Guelph, Canada
Towhidul Islam, University of Guelph, Canada

Read More

Featured

Assemblages of Denim: Transforming from Mundane to Remarkable Consumption Object

Eminegül Karababa, Middle East Technical University
Mahmut Sami Islek, Eskisehir Osmangazi University
Ufuk Ay, KTO Karatay University

Read More

Engage with Us

Becoming an Association for Consumer Research member is simple. Membership in ACR is relatively inexpensive, but brings significant benefits to its members.