The Consumer Perceived Value Scale: Replication and Development of a Short Scale

In recent years perceived value has attracted significant attention among marketing scholars. Recently, Sweeney and Soutar (2001) identified four dimensions of consumer perceived value (CPV) and developed scales to measure these dimensions. Their CPV scale, based on previous research in Australia, was administered to consumers in Germany. We assess the cross-cultural validity of the measure of consumer perceived value (Study 1). After validating the CPV scale, an abbreviated version of the CPV scale (with 12 items) is proposed and assessed that has equally good dimensional properties as the original version. In Study 2, using a second sample, we validate and apply the abbreviated version of the CPV scale.



Citation:

Gianfranco Walsh, Thomas Kilian, and Holger Buxel (2008) ,"The Consumer Perceived Value Scale: Replication and Development of a Short Scale", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 35, eds. Angela Y. Lee and Dilip Soman, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 688-689.

Authors

Gianfranco Walsh, University of Koblenz-Landau, Germany
Thomas Kilian, University of Koblenz-Landau, Germany
Holger Buxel, University of Applied Science Muenster, Germany



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 35 | 2008



Share Proceeding

Featured papers

See More

Featured

Promoting Well-being and Combating Harassment in the Academy

Ekant Veer, University of Canterbury, New Zealand
Zeynep Arsel, Concordia University, Canada
June Cotte, Ivey Business School
Jenna Drenten, Loyola University Chicago, USA
Markus Geisler, York University, Canada
Lauren Gurrieri, RMIT University
Julie L. Ozanne, University of Melbourne, Australia
Nicholas Pendarvis, California State University Los Angeles, USA
Andrea Prothero, University College Dublin
Minita Sanghvi, Skidmore College
Rajiv Vaidyanathan, University of Minnesota Duluth, USA
Stacy Wood, North Carolina State University

Read More

Featured

L11. Consumer Search Mode Produces Unintended Marketing Consequences

Dan King, University of Texas Rio Grande Valley, USA
Sumitra Auschaitrakul, University of the Thai Chamber of Commerce

Read More

Featured

Thou Shalt Not Look! When Processing the Odds Visually Biases Gambling Behavior

Rod Duclos, Western University, Canada
Mansur Khamitov, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore

Read More

Engage with Us

Becoming an Association for Consumer Research member is simple. Membership in ACR is relatively inexpensive, but brings significant benefits to its members.