Do “Possessors” Really Have a Stronger Desire to Possess Than “Non Possessors” ? Study of Consumer Desires of Visitors and Collectors of Contemporary Art Vis À Vis Two Modes of Consumption- Access and Possession

Do “possessors” really have a stronger desire to possess than “accessors”?

A Study of consumer desire of visitors and collectors of contemporary art vis à vis two modes of consumption- access and possession

 

Yu CHEN

HEC School of Management, Paris, France


Abstract:

 

Few consumer studies have been done regarding the situation where both “possession” and “access” - as two possible available means to “consume” the wanted goods- can occur depending on the consumers’ desires and choices. Results in this study show that consumers have some contradictory desires vis à vis their behaviours. Regarding the desire for “possession”, collectors (possessors) have a weaker possessive desire compared to museum visitors (accessors). They also have weaker desires for accomplishment, for keeping family traditions and for intellectual enrichment than visitors, while having a stronger philanthropic desire and desire for sociality. Regarding the desire for “access”, visitors have a weaker desire for a simple visit than collectors while having stronger desires for sociality and for freedom.



Citation:

CHEN Yu (2006) ,"Do “Possessors” Really Have a Stronger Desire to Possess Than “Non Possessors” ? Study of Consumer Desires of Visitors and Collectors of Contemporary Art Vis À Vis Two Modes of Consumption- Access and Possession ", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 33, eds. Connie Pechmann and Linda Price, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 285-286.

Authors

CHEN Yu, HEC School of Management, Paris, France



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 33 | 2006



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