Children and Snack Foods: Is There a Relationship Between Television Viewing Habits and Nutritional Knowledge and Product Choice?

This study aims to add to the ongoing discussion of the causes of childhood obesity by investigating whether a relationship exists between the amount of television watched and the child’s knowledge of good nutrition, their criteria for choice, and the hypothetical and actual choice of healthy products. Using a structured questionnaire, interviews were conducted with 67 children aged between 7 and 12 years of age. Correlations were found between the amount of television viewed and their stated criteria for choice, but not between television viewed and hypothetical choice, actual product choice or children’s nutritional knowledge.



Citation:

Lesley White and Teresa Davis (2006) ,"Children and Snack Foods: Is There a Relationship Between Television Viewing Habits and Nutritional Knowledge and Product Choice?", in AP - Asia-Pacific Advances in Consumer Research Volume 7, eds. Margaret Craig Lees, Teresa Davis, and Gary Gregory, Sydney, Australia : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 277-282.

Authors

Lesley White, Macquarie Graduate School of Management, Australia
Teresa Davis, University of Sydney



Volume

AP - Asia-Pacific Advances in Consumer Research Volume 7 | 2006



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